Caribbean Wall of Fame: Jamaican Ann-Marie Campbell, from Cashier to Executive Vice President


Ann-Marie Campbell is Executive Vice President of U.S. stores for Home Depot. Born in Kingston, Jamaica,she is the youngest of four children and the only girl. Her grandmother owned a furniture and appliance store, where Ann-Marie worked during the summer and school breaks. During the school year, she boarded at the Holy Childhood High School, a Catholic boarding school for girls. After graduating high school in 1981,she and her mother and brothers immigrated to the United States, settling in Miami.

In her role as executive vice president she oversees 2,000 stores and most of the company's nearly 400,000 employees. Ann-Marie started her career over 30 years ago at Home Depot as a part-time cashier. She caught the attention of vice president Lynn Martin when she volunteered the answer to a question Martin asked when she came to Ann-Marie's branch for a "store walk." Martin became a mentor to Ann-Marie, encouraging her to pursue promotions in various parts of the organization. Ann-Marie advanced to various positions in the company including Department Manager, Store Manager, District Manager, Regional Vice President, Vice President of Operations, Vice President of Merchandising and Special Orders, Vice President of Retail Marketing and Sales, Vice President of Vendor Services, and then President of the southern division in 2009. She was promoted to her current position as Executive Vice President of U.S. stores in January 2016. Ann-Marie has worked to give back to others. She established the Ann-Marie Campbell Scholarship for undergraduates at the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University (GSU). She earned an M.B.A. at the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at GSU in 2005. Ann-Marie was named to Fortune's 2014 list of 50 Most Powerful Women in Business, one of Atlanta's 100 Top Black Women of Influence by the Atlanta Business League in 2012, and one of the 75 Most Powerful Women in Business by Black Enterprise in 2010.

Sources: Fortune.com, Wikipedia